Children of a Duke

Sons and daughters of a Duke are treated differently.

Sons of a Duke

The eldest son of a duke will take one of his father’s other, but lower order, peerage titles.
For example, the eldest son of the Duke of Stepney could be known as Marquess of Saltmarsh. So in this case you would use all the forms of address for a marquess.

(This might not apply in Scotland).

The younger son(s) of a duke assume the courtesy title of ‘Lord’ which they put before their forename and surname.

So Richard Smith, youngest son of the Duke of Stepney would become Lord Richard Smith.

Just like their father, the sons’ military and church titles come before the courtesy title.
For example Major Lord Richard Smith.

How to address the Younger Son of a Duke

The recommended social form of address is as follows:

You begin a letter with “Dear Lord Richard” and end the letter with “Yours sincerely”
The envelope should be addressed as “Lord Richard Smith”

When speaking you would call him “Lord Richard”
For example, “Good morning Lord Richard”.

An invitation, to dinner, for example would be addressed to “Lord Richard Smith”.
(But traditionally if he is married, it should be addressed to his wife and the invitation should have both their names on it).

Description in conversation Lord Richard
List of Directors or Patrons Lord Richard Smith
Place card for dinner would have “Lord Richard Smith” written on it.

On a legal document you would use “Richard Smith commonly called Lord Richard Smith” as it is a courtesy title.

marquess

Daughters of a Duke

A daughter of a duke uses the title of ‘Lady’ before her forename and surname.
For example Lady Susan Smith.

Upon marrying Lady Susan Smith would continue to use her forename but she would add her husband’s sirname.
For example when Lady Susan Smith marries Mister Jones she would become Lady Susan Jones.

If Lady Susan Smith marries a peer she then adopts his title.

How to address the Daughter of a Duke

The recommended social form of address is as follows:
You begin a letter with “Dear Lady Susan” and end the letter with “Yours sincerely”.

Joint form of address when married to a man without a title (Mr. Eric Jones married to Lady Susan Smith for example) Mr Eric and Lady Susan Jones

Speaking to her you would call her Lady Susan and if you were introducing her to someone you would call her Lady Susan Smith or Lady Susan Jones as appropriate.

An invitation to just her would be Lady Susan Smith,
but an invitation to her and her husband (without a title) would be Mr Eric and Lady Susan Jones.

The dinner table place card would be Lady Susan Smith or Lady Susan Jones as appropriate.

An on a legal document she would be described by all her names, Susan Mary Diana Smith commonly called Lady Susan Smith (or Lady Susan Jones if married to Mr. Jones).

Like all good rules there are some exceptions!

* If Lady Susan Smith (the ‘Lady’ is a courtesy title for a daughter of a duke) marries a peer who also holds a courtesy title – and his title is ‘lower’ than hers then she has two options:

1. Lady Susan Smith can adopt the usual style as a wife of a courtesy peer, such as Viscountess Wrighton.

2. Lady Susan Smith can keep her title and her first name and adopt her husband’s courtesy title, and become Lady Susan Wrighton.

Nowadays Ladies tend to go for the first option.

* If the daughter of a duke marries the younger son of a duke or a marquess then she has two options:

1. Lady Susan Smith can adopt the usual style of the wife of a younger son of a duke or marquess, and take his first and sirname, for example Lady Eric Jones.

2. She can continue to use her own title followed by her own sirname. for example continuing her own style followed by her own surname, eg Lady Susan Smith.

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